Okay, Grass–Ready, Set, Grow!

Our Yard–Amended, Raked, and Ready for Hydroseeding

What can you do for a lawn in the Northern Arizona desert? The answer depends on how much water you have available. Many folks–and after all, it’s their choice and their water bill–decide on good old Kentucky Blue Grass. It takes a ton of water, but it’s pretty, even if not environmentally defensible.

On the other end of the spectrum some folks just say, “Forget it,” and cover their lawn with rocks instead of grass. But that choice is less compatible with grandchildren and it’s hot, besides. Sod? Nope–only available in Kentucky Blue Grass. Seed is available in every type and description, but with Holbrook’s perpetual wind, loose seed simply picks up and blows away. What to do?

As we pondered this problem, our helpful insurance man suggested something new to us: hydroseeding. He explained that water, mulch, and an appropriate mix of grass seeds are combined and then sprayed onto the prepared lawn. The mulch holds the seed in place until the grass starts to grow. That sounded like a winner to us. So just over a week ago, the hydroseeders came to help us out. Here, they are breaking up the green mulch into the tank of water and seed.

Mixing Water, Mulch, and Grass Seed

Soon, a heavy green carpet of mulch covered our lawn. It looked a bit artificial but still seemed hopeful to us.

The lawn is coated with the mixture.

And now, a week or so later, voila! Grass is beginning to grow through the mulch. It’s not rocket science, but it certainly solved a problem for us! Stop by for a visit and see the end result!

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2 responses to this post.

  1. Posted by Wes on June 8, 2012 at 9:25 am

    Yay Johnson’s! That has to be a miracle, growing grass in the desert. Hmm, perhaps an idea for Jeff’s sermon?!

    Reply

  2. It feels miraculous, for sure. I’ll tell Jeff you said to use it as a sermon illustration! Hi to Linda and the kids!

    Reply

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